Geology of Dartmoor

An Introduction to Dartmoor through Deep Time;its Geology, Tor Formation and Mineralogy.

  • First new book on Dartmoor’s geology since 1972 
  • Describes Dartmoor’s geology, tor formation and mineralogy 
  • Includes 97 detailed illustrations and 161 photographs 
  • Full glossary, references and bibliography.

This book is for anyone interested in Dartmoor; especially those who wonder at the sparkles in the ground. Whether the reader has a love of Dartmoor and its curious tors, or they have a background in earth sciences and seek to learn more about its world-class geology, this book will take the reader on a journey through deep time from Dartmoor’s earliest geological history to the present day. It is brimming with illustrations to explain the principles of geology with plentiful photographs to demonstrate Dartmoor’s extraordinary rocks, minerals and features.

£27.00 FREE P&P

Dartmoor Tin Mining

This book looks at early mining activity on Dartmoor from the twelfth century, when Stannary Law in Devon was first established, through the following centuries when mining remained largely an activity of the individual; the ‘Old Men’ toiling either alone or in small groups.

This was before the era of industrialised mining by which time the miners largely ceased working for themselves and became employees of corporate mining operations.

Tin mining on Dartmoor has left an indelible mark on the moorland landscape, from the early tin streaming activity through to the later underground workings. Remains of blowing houses, wheel pits and tinners’ burrows are there in abundance, although those walking on the moor may not recognise them for what they are.

This book will enhance the reader’s understanding of the moor’s history by bringing the early story of miners and mining to life, not least through over 250 photographs included, dating from the earliest years of photography through to pictures taken today.

Together with the informative text and illustrations, these photographs exemplify the importance of the Dartmoor Trust Archive in being able to evidence changes that have taken place on the moor in the past 150 years or so, along with capturing what can be seen in the landscape today.

As interest in our industrial heritage has become more to the fore, a final chapter has been included containing photographs of the last years of mining operations on Dartmoor and from Kelly Mine, Lustleigh, where work is continuing to preserve and restore a former mine site, the last of its kind on Dartmoor.

Bruce Boulton is a member of the Kelly Mine Preservation Society, although his interest in underground exploration stems from his boyhood at Rock House, Chudleigh – formerly well known as Rock Nursery Garden, Caves and Café. Bruce’s back garden comprised the massive redundant limestone quarry, an overgrown Victorian jungle with 80ft cliffs and a labyrinthine system of caves.

Before the age of ten he became assistant to the pioneer bat researchers, John and Win Hooper, studying Greater Horseshoe bats, a cause necessitating scrambling through subterranean darkness in order to record and ring them. This in turn led to visits to many former mines and a lifelong interest in that subject; a passion shared by Mary and Jessica Walmesley whose original text forms the core of this book. Now retired, Bruce continues his love of gardening and, when he has time, makes pottery.

£9.99 FREE P&P

The Perambulation: Dartmoor’s Greatest Long Distance Walk

The forty-three mile boundary of the ‘Ancient Forest of Dartmoor’, at the heart of the National Park, is an established long distance walk. Twelve knights first undertook the walk in 1240 on the orders of King Henry III. Their aim was to define the boundary so that fees for those using the royal land could be exacted.

This sumptuously illustrated book provides the reader with the comprehensive story of how Dartmoor’s Greatest Long Distance Walk came into being. It also gives details of sixteen excursions that modern-day walkers may undertake to retrace the route of the twelve medieval knights who first undertook this historic ‘perambulation’.

Their work has been re-interpreted many times since 1240 but for the first time, in this book, using modern navigational tools and after extensive research in archives and in the field, the author details a contemporary interpretation of the boundary.

This book offers a summary of previous studies, a guide to the locations of the historical artifacts examined, and includes suggestions for walks on the moor. It will hopefully act as a spur for others to retrace this part of our Royal history. Here are maps covering sixteen walks, some short, some long, with a description of each in order that the present-day walker might retrace part of our Royal heritage while exploring historic Dartmoor for themselves.

Roland Ebdon grew up in Exeter, Devon and has been walking on Dartmoor on-and-off for over fifty years. He was introduced to the moor by an uncle who grew up at Meldon where his father had been a quarryman. Thirty-four years of service in the army then took him away from Devon and around the world. in 1983 and 1984, he considered himself lucky to command the royal Signallers providing communications for the checkpoints for the Ten Tors events. although based at Okehampton Camp, he spent many happy hours, day and night, trekking from one site to another before and during these events. After retiring from the army, he joined Kodak just as digital photography was taking off. Following a hip replacement and needing to get fit again, he started geocaching, a hobby that soon brought him back to the moor. He placed some of the earliest caches in the remotest of places to encourage others into the deepest parts of the moor. In 2007 he read about the Forest of Dartmoor and its first perambulation. Since then, it has occupied his thoughts and much of his time. Now he aims to introduce others, including his grandchildren, to this piece of history and to the moor.

£19.99 FREE P&P

Discover Prehistoric Dartmoor

Over 600 superb illustrations supporting William Lethbridge’s text make this book an essential companion for anyone with an interest in Dartmoor. It also provides a vital visual record of hundreds of prehistoric sites and artefacts, many little known and difficult to discover, that future generations will have in their care.

The enduring fascination of the Dartmoor landscape rests in large part with the presence of so many visible remains of our prehistoric ancestors. Here it is possible to picture the lives of the people who inhabited the moor thousands of years ago and whose daily life we can visualise through the fascinating artefacts they left behind.

From huge Neolithic burial chambers and spectacular Bronze Age stone rows and circles to the more intimate hut circles and graves, visitors to the moor need only walk a few yards from their car before finding many such sites. In this book,William Lethbridge encourages both the casual walker and the more intrepid explorers to follow in his footsteps in order to discover for themselves the hundreds of prehistoric sites and individual remains that lie on the open moor for all to see. Detailed maps and photographs will help inspire those planning to walk the moor in search of historical remains just as they will also fascinate the armchair explorer keen to know more about Dartmoor’s past. Many of these remains are vulnerable to natural changes and to the hand of man. The author’s emphasis on ‘look but do not touch’ underpins the modern walker’s code in our growing appreciation of fragile historic landscapes.

Over 600 superb illustrations supporting the author’s text make this book an essential companion for anyone with an interest in Dartmoor. It also provides a vital visual record of hundreds of prehistoric sites and artefacts, many little known and difficult to discover, that future generations will have in their care.

William Lethbridge has travelled around the world seeking out ancient sites. But no matter how far and wide his travels have taken him, Dartmoor calls no sooner he arrives home. The author has explored Dartmoor for over forty years, never walking in a straight line but meandering here and there with eyes peeled for whatever is there to see.

Among the interesting artefacts he has found and recorded is a stone row on the escarpment below Shell Top, a covered kistvaen on Giant’s Hill, and one or two mortar stones left by early tin miners, all hitherto unknown to us, and all of which appear in his first book One Man’s Moor. Further discoveries provided the incentive to write this new volume in which he encourages others to explore Dartmoor’s fascinating pre-history.

£19.99 FREE P&P

Panoramic Dartmoor

A landscape on a large scale demands a book of similar proportions and here, spread across double pages of lavish proportions, are some of the most glorious images that nature can provide. From renowned Devon photographer Adrian Oakes.

The wide open sweep of Dartmoor’s unique character has featured in countless books of photography, but few have captured it so well as photographer Adrian Oakes in Panoramic Dartmoor.

A landscape on a large scale demands a book of similar proportions and here, spread across double pages of lavish proportions, are some of the most glorious images that nature can provide.

From springtime bluebells carpeting boundless meadows, to the purple and golds of autumn colours, and from mist shrouded tors to rushing rivers, the essence of Dartmoor is captured here.

Those who know the moor well will delight in the wonderful photographs this book contains, appreciating the endless patience of the photographer who has waited for that precise shot that portrays a particular fall of sunlight, the shadow across a hillside, and the bright flash of water tumbling in a stream.

For those yet to discover the infinite variety of Dartmoor, this book will provide all the inspiration they need to explore its endless possibilities.

Adrian Oakes is a landscape and contemporary photographer based in Devon. He has kindled a great love and respect for Dartmoor over the last twenty years and more recently has focused on photographing its diverse landscapes and rich history. His clients include The Dartmoor National Park Authority and the National Trust who also sell prints and cards of his work.

£19.99 FREE P&P

Perfect Dartmoor

Dartmoor is not huge but is easily large enough to get lost in.Those who know the moor well will delight in the wonderful photographs this book contains, appreciating the endless patience of the photographer who has waited for that precise shot that encapsulates a particular fall of sunlight, the shadow across a hillside, and the bright flash of water tumbling in a stream. For those yet to discover the delights of Dartmoor, this book will provide inspiration to explore.

Dartmoor represents to most people a place of restful beauty, a landscape in which it is easy to feel at one with the natural world. It is this sense of wilderness that first draws people to the moor, and its diversity which keeps them coming back. And it is a fact that the more one gets to know Dartmoor, the more there is to know.

Dartmoor became a National Park in 1951. It covers an area of 369 square miles and is home and workplace for over 30 000 people, as well as a favoured recreational focus for visitors.Towering granite tors dominate the landscape and are its most prominent and well-known feature. Much of the current landscape is the end result of habitation and farming dating back to prehistoric times. Plentiful evidence of this early occupation is to be found in standing stones, cairns, burial chambers, hut circles and stone rows. In more recent times quarrying and mining has left scars upon the landscape, while farms, hamlets and larger settlements have grown into desirable places to live, overturning many of the traditional occupations of country life in the past hundred years.

Dartmoor is not huge but is easily large enough to get lost in.Those who know the moor well will delight in the wonderful photographs this book contains, appreciating the endless patience of the photographer who has waited for that precise shot that encapsulates a particular fall of sunlight, the shadow across a hillside, and the bright flash of water tumbling in a stream. For those yet to discover the delights of Dartmoor, this book will provide inspiration to explore.

Adrian Oakes is a landscape and contemporary photographer based in Devon. He has kindled a great love and respect for Dartmoor over the last twenty years and more recently has focused on photographing its diverse landscapes and rich history. His clients include The Dartmoor National Park Authority and National Trust who also sell prints and cards of his work in many outlets. Adrian specialises in panoramas of Dartmoor and East Devon and has had photographs published in a wide variety of media.

£14.99 FREE P&P

DARTMOOR – A Timeless Landscape

Once you start, you’ll never finish. Getting to know Dartmoor is a lifelong habit that’s hard to break. There is so much here; so much to see, do, smell and feel. It is bleak, and beautiful. Accessible, yet also remote. A living, working museum of life, biodiversity and history: Dartmoor awaits you to explore its secrets.

Dartmoor – A Timeless Landscape is the brand new Official Visitor Guide to Dartmoor National Park. It is bursting with 185 photographs showing what Dartmoor has to offer the visitor, including:

  • Geology and Landscape
  • Heritage
  • Habitats and Wildlife
  • Folklore and Customs
  • Towns and Villages
  • Dartmoor Today.

Photographed and written by photographer Josephine Collingwood, who previously produced the best-selling Dartmoor Tors Compendium, it gives a fresh approach to enticing visitors and locals alike to explore the moor more.

110 pages

185 photographs

Format: Paperback 210x192mm

£15.00 FREE P&P

DARTMOOR TORS COMPENDIUM

Have you ever gone for a walk on Dartmoor and wandered around aimlessly? Now, there is new book about Dartmoor with over 700 professional photographs and informative facts about each of Dartmoor’s tors. It shows the reader how nearly every tor on Dartmoor is surrounded by an astonishing abundance of fascinating features and history.

Dartmoor Tors Compendium differs from all before it in that it brings together the features and history around each tor and presents them as a compendium of information, illustrated with evocative images that only a photographer can capture.

  • First ever Dartmoor compendium combining professional photography and well-researched facts.
  • Covers Dartmoor’s geology, archaeology, history, mining and agricultural legacies.
  • Includes a map, drawings, 718 photographs and glossary.
  • Foreword by Dartmoor National Park Authority’s Chief Executive Kevin Bishop.
  • Gives GPS locations for special features hidden in the landscape.

334 pages 

718 photographs

Format: Paperback 240x220mm

 

£27.00 FREE P&P